DT Podcast Episode 23 – Charles Curran

Prof. Charles Curran

Prof. Charles Curran

Welcome to episode 23! The latest installment of the Daily Theology Podcast features Mike Avery’s conversation with Dr. Charles E. Curran of Southern Methodist University. In their conversation, the two discussed Curran’s vocation as a diocesan priest and his initial skepticism towards being a teacher. The episode then ventured into such topics as Humanae Vitae, Curran’s investigation with the CDF and the necessity of dissent in response to the sign of the times. To conclude, Curran laments the narrow focus of his scholarship, even admitting to not being radical enough, but takes heart in theology’s renewed shift towards those on the margins.

Prof. Charles Curran is the Elizabeth Scurlock University Professor of Human Values at Southern Methodist University. He holds STD degrees from Academia Alfonsiana and the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome, an STL from the Gregorian, and a BA from St. Bernard’s College in Rochester, NY. He previously taught at the Catholic University of America from 1965-1986. He has served as the president of the Catholic Theological Society of America, the Society of Christian Ethics, and the American Theological Society. He is the author of numerous books, including Tradition and Church Reform: Perspectives on Catholic Moral Teaching (Orbis Books, 2016); The Development of Moral Theology: Five Strands (Moral Traditions) (Georgetown University Press, 2013); Catholic Moral Theology in the United States: A History (Moral Traditions) (Georgetown University Press, 2008); and The Catholic Moral Tradition Today: A Synthesis (Moral Traditions) (Georgetown University Press, 1999). For more of his biography, check out Loyal Dissent: Memoir of a Catholic Theologian (Georgetown University Press, 2006).

You can subscribe to the podcast on iTunes or you can listen to the episode below!

Podcast music courtesy of Matt Hines of Eastern Sea, whom you can find on Facebook, Twitter, or Spotify

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