DT Podcast Episode 8 – Colby Dickinson

Colby Dickinson (photo courtesy Loyola University Chicago)

Colby Dickinson (photo courtesy Loyola University Chicago)

In today’s podcast episode, Mike Avery talks with Colby Dickinson of Loyola University Chicago! They talk about the importance of literature for theology, what makes a great professor, and how attending to the requests of students can lead to new and unexpected courses.

Colby Dickinson is Assistant Professor of Theology at Loyola University, Chicago, where he is also the director of majors and minors for the department. He earned his Ph.D. in theology (as well as his STB, STL, and STD) from the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven in Belgium, an MA in religious education from Saint Louis University, and his MTS from Duke Divinity School. He is the author of Agamben and Theology (T&T Clark, 2011), Between the Canon and the Messiah: The Structure of Faith in Contemporary Continental Thought (Bloomsbury, 2013), The Spiritual and Creative Failures of Representation: On Poetry, Theology and the Potential of the Human Being (Fordham University Press, 2016) and, with Adam Kotsko, Agamben’s Coming Philosophy: Finding a New Use for Theology (Rowman & Littlefied, 2015). He is the editor of The Postmodern ‘Saints’ of France: Refiguring ‘the Holy’ in Contemporary French Philosophy (T&T Clark, 2013), The Shaping of Tradition: Context and Normativity (Peeters, 2013) and co-editor, with Stéphane Symons, of Walter Benjamin and Theology (Fordham University Press, 2016).

You can subscribe to the podcast on iTunes or you can listen to the episode below!

Podcast music courtesy of Matt Hines of Eastern Sea, whom you can find on Facebook, Twitter, or Spotify

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s